Prevent All Types of Cancer with Anti-CANCER FOODS http://bit.ly/2leipwQ. They have been proven to have a large amount of properties and benefit. Cancer Prevention Diet http://bit.ly/2xkxejd – How to Lower Your Risk with Cancer-Fighting Foods http://bit.ly/2izd5TT! While there’s no magic food or diet guaranteed to cure or prevent cancer, lifestyle factors—including your diet—can make a big difference in lowering your risk of developing the disease http://bit.ly/2h6T1EN. And if you are currently battling cancer, adopting the right diet now can help maintain your strength and boost your emotional wellbeing as you go through treatment. By avoiding foods that increase your risk of cancer http://bit.ly/2iArM9u and eating more of those that support your immune system, you can better protect your health and boost your ability fight off cancer http://bit.ly/2yKYuZD and other diseases.

What’s the link between cancer and diet http://bit.ly/2ixWCzt?
Some cancer risk factors, such as genetics and environment, are out of your control, but research suggest that about 70% of your lifetime risk of cancer is within your power to change, including your diet. Avoiding cigarettes, limiting alcohol, reaching a healthy weight, and getting regular exercise are all great steps for preventing cancer http://bit.ly/2zAsyGz. Adopting a healthy diet can also play a vital role.

What you eat—and don’t eat—can have a powerful effect on your health, including your risk for cancer. While research tends to point to associations between specific foods and cancer, rather than solid cause-and-effect relationships, there are certain dietary habits that can have a major influence on your risk. For example, eating a traditional Mediterranean diet rich in fruit, vegetables, and healthy fats like olive oil can lower your risk for a variety of common cancers, including breast cancer. Conversely, a diet that includes a daily serving of processed meat increases your risk of colorectal cancer http://bit.ly/2yHDV2E.

If you have a history of cancer in your family, making small changes to your diet and behaviors now can make a big difference to your long-term health. And if you’ve already been diagnosed with cancer, eating a nutritious diet can help support your mood and strengthen your body during this challenging time.

Simple ways to build your cancer-prevention diet http://bit.ly/2yMk3L2
To lower your risk for many types of cancer—as well as other serious disease—aim to build your diet around a variety of antioxidant-rich fruit and vegetables, nuts, beans, whole grains, and healthy fats. At the same time, try to limit the amount of processed and fried foods, unhealthy fats, sugars and refined carbs you consume.

Lower your risk with antioxidants http://bit.ly/2yHVsrE

Plant-based foods are rich in nutrients known as antioxidants that boost your immune system and help protect against cancer cells.

Diets high in fruit may lower the risk of stomach and lung cancer.
Eating vegetables containing carotenoids, such as carrots, Brussels sprouts, and squash, may reduce the risk of lung, mouth, pharynx, and larynx cancers.
Diets high in non-starchy vegetables, such as broccoli, spinach, and beans, may help protect against stomach and esophageal cancer.
Eating oranges, berries, peas, bell peppers, dark leafy greens and other foods high in vitamin C may also protect against esophageal cancer.
Foods high in lycopene, such as tomatoes, guava, and watermelon, may lower the risk of prostate cancer.
Add more fruit and veggies to your diet

Currently, most of us fall well short of the recommended daily minimum of five servings of fruit and vegetables. To add more to your diet, focus on adding “whole” foods, as close to their natural state as possible. For example, eat an unpeeled apple instead of drinking apple juice.

Breakfast: Add fresh fruit, seeds, and nuts to your whole grain, low-sugar breakfast cereal (such as oatmeal).

Lunch: Eat a salad filled with your favorite beans and peas or other combo of veggies. Add lettuce, tomato, and avocado to a whole grain sandwich. Have a side of carrots, sauerkraut, or fruit.

Snacks: Grab an apple or banana on your way out the door. Dip carrots, celery, cucumbers, jicama, and peppers in hummus. Keep trail mix made with nuts and dried fruit on hand.

Dinner: Add fresh or frozen veggies to your favorite pasta sauce or rice dish. Top a baked potato with broccoli, sautéed veggies, or salsa.

Dessert: Choose fruit instead of sugary desserts.

Fill up on fiber

Fiber, also called roughage or bulk, is found in fruit, vegetables, and whole grains and plays a key role in keeping your digestive system clean and healthy. It helps keep cancer-causing compounds moving through your digestive tract before they can create harm. Eating a diet high in fiber may help prevent colorectal cancer and other common digestive system cancers, including stomach, mouth, and pharynx.

Leave a Reply

Let us help fight cancer. Share your knowledge.

About

Latest news, views, insights and trends on cancer treatment, discovery and support

Navigation